Less May Be More with Content

Less May Be More with Content

After work, I like to drop into a local pub and strike up a conversation with any random person at the bar. Last Friday, I went to Herbie’s. There wasn’t anyone particularly interesting to talk to, so I started chatting with Heather, the bartender.

We talked about the weather, other bar patrons, and then she mentioned it was her last night. She said she was moving to the new Taste location in the Central West End. Exciting stuff I said.

Later, a large group of people that were part of what I can only describe as a video game-themed pub crawl came in and spoiled the atmosphere. I started to worry that with a more prominent, larger location, Taste may get more traffic. I sat wondering if this was really a good thing.

For those who are not familiar, Taste is a small intimate cocktail bar attached to Niche in Benton Park. The guy behind the bar, Ted Kilgore, is a master mixologist. Ted is very serious about the cocktails he mixes and pours.

So, how does this news make it on to the Atomicdust blog?

I have been hard at work on my content strategy presentation for the MGMA conference. Until now, I have had a hard time with an analogy of how less, more specialized content better serves marketing goals.

By now, most companies have a website, blog, Twitter account, Facebook page, another blog, the email newsletter and are probably generating an onslaught of content for their customers. In A Call for Content, I wrote that determining why content is being created and what purpose it serves are the foundations of content strategy.

At Taste, they craft a small number of delicious drinks that require time and effort to prepare. Taste is not the place to order a highball or beer. The “why” of Taste is to serve exquisite cocktails to a small and defined audience. My fear is at their new location, the quality may suffer in an effort to serve more.

Developing a set of rules that govern the creation, publication and use of content ensures your brand doesn’t suffer a similar fate. Visitors to your site, who come seeking a specialist, will not find your expertise diluted by frivolous content.

Ultimately, less content that is of higher quality, more specialized and strategic will prevail in creating trust and long term customers.

 

imageJames Dixson, Principal / CMO at Atomicdust, has experience in all aspects of marketing, with core knowledge in interactive marketing, the world wide web and all things Apple.

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James Dixson

James Dixson, Partner at Atomicdust, has experience in all aspects of marketing, with core knowledge in interactive marketing, the world wide web and all things Apple.

James Dixson